BUNCHEONG
'분청'(Buncheong)

 
덤벙 (Dumbung) is one of the techniques of 분청 (buncheong) pottery – where you simply dip your clay vessel in a white slip clay. The main characteristics are the white slip clay dripping patterns and the natural area where the white slip clay isn’t covered. 분청 (Buncheong) is a form of pottery unique to Korea, first emerging at the end of the 14th century and lasting for about two centuries. 분청 (Buncheong) ware is marked by crude forms and child-like motifs with a coarse texture.

분청 (Buncheong) ware was developed by different regional people and were designed to be practical. Therefore, 분청 (buncheong) ware has certain freedom in the styles and forms that are produced -  unrestricted by any criteria. These traits are considered to be an important value by the ceramists today and 분청 (buncheong) is still practiced by many Korean artists.
1. Mix the clay up to the specific needs and blend together.
2. Throw the clay onto the wheel and mould the clay form.
3. Refine the vessel with tools.
4. 덤벙 (Dumbung) technique – dip the vessel into a white slip clay.
1. Mix the clay up to the specific needs and blend together.
2. Throw the clay onto the wheel and mould the clay form.
3. Refine the vessel with tools.
4. 덤벙 (Dumbung) technique – dip the vessel into a white slip clay.
5. The vessel is completely covered in white slip clay except where the hand is holding the vessel.
6. Dry the vessels.
7. The vessels are fired between 1000–1350 celsius degrees inside the wood kiln. 
8. The temperature is controlled by adding soil and wood.
5. The vessel is completely covered in white slip clay except where the hand is holding the vessel.
6. Dry the vessels.
7. The vessels are fired between 1000–1350 celsius degrees inside the wood kiln. 
8. The temperature is controlled by adding soil and wood.
9. Reaching the end of the firing.
10. The part where the hand was holding the vessel leaves a natural pattern on the vessel.
11. The unique texture is created by the fire – exposing the iron in the clay.
9. Reaching the end of the firing.
10. The part where the hand was holding the vessel leaves a natural pattern on the vessel.
11. The unique texture is created by the fire – exposing the iron in the clay.

© Images provided by
– Sung Wook Park
– Cultural Heritage Administration


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